Monday, November 5, 2018

Blog has moved to new location

Dear Readers in my circles,

My blog has been moved. If you would like to receive notification of my posts, please complete the signup form below.

I am now posting every week. Six new posts are up including:


78: Making a Child’s Dress from a Home Sewing Pattern



I had a new website designed this past summer. My blog was moved so as to be accesable from my website. My blog's address is now:  https://cfashionedu.com/blog/

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Sunday, September 23, 2018

77: Moving the Bust Area

Probably the most important single fit aspect of a garment is the fit over the bust.

If a bodice pattern has bust darting the darting often needs to be moved to allow the bodice to fit correctly.

Here are instructions that show how to do that.



1. Measure from point to point.
Divide the measurement in half.


2. Mark a straight-grain line
 on the front bodice pattern,
 that distance from the 
center-front grain line.
1. Measure the from point to point. Divide the measurement in half.
4. Mark the true bust point on the
bodice pattern, the measured
width from the center front to
the true bust point.

2. Mark a straight-grain line on the front bodice pattern, that distance from the center-front grain line.



3. Measure the length from 
the shoulder to the true bust point.











3. Measure the length from the shoulder to the true bust point.

4. Mark the true bust point on the bodice pattern, the measured width from the center front to the true bust point.



6. Lay tracing paper over the dart
area.

5. Lay the pattern over the
model to see if the true bust point
is correct.




















5. Lay the pattern over the model to see if the true bust point is correct.

6. Lay tracing paper over the bodice pattern's dart area.

7.  Use RED pencil to trace the darts.
With RED pencil trace the straight grain
that is marked through the waist dart.

8. Move the traced darts and 
straight-grain line so the traced 
original true bust point now 
lies over the true bust point.
Tape the tracing in place.
























7.  Use RED pencil to trace the darts.  With RED pencil trace the straight grain  that is marked through the waist dart.



8. Move the traced darts and straight-grain line so traced original true bust point now lies over the model's true bust point. Tape the tracing in place.


9. Trace the front bodice with the new
carts. Add a 3/4 inch seam allowance
down the center front.



10. Cut the front and back bodices in
muslin. Pin together. Check the bust
fit. Mark the darts' sewing points.
Re-pin the darts.





















9. Trace the front bodice with the new darts. Add a 3/4 inch seam allowance down the center front. 

10. Cut the front and back bodices in muslin. Pin together. Check the bust fit. Mark the darts' sewing points. Re-pin the darts.

11.  Lay the front bodice pattern over
the muslin. Copy the sewn dart pints.
Mark the sewn dart points with BLUE 
pencil.



12. From the lower third of the
armhole mark a line to the
true bust point.























11.  Lay the front bodice pattern over the muslin. Copy the sewn dart points. Mark the sewn dart points with BLUE pencil.

12. From the lower third of the armhole mark a line to the true bust point.

13. Fold the bust dart as shown. With RED pencil 
connect the underarm/side seam intersection with 
the waistline/side seam intersection.

13. Fold the bust dart as shown. With RED pencil connect the underarm/side seam intersection with the waistline/side seam intersection.


Thanks for reading! Your comments are most welcome. Questions? Email or call 215 884 7065. 

If interested in reading more posts about fashion technology, please consider adding your name to this blog's circles. Please consider following me on Facebook where I post links to fashion feeds and other fashion related topics.

Look for the article about seam allowance modification that I wrote for Threads Magazine. It is in their 199 issue that is now in libraries and on the newsstands. 

I am currently working on a book that presents how to custom grade patterns to fit. All work can be done in the home with minimal equipment - tracing paper, pencils, transparent ruler. I'm hoping to have that book finished by the end of this year. It's sequel, Grading and Sewing a Blouse is finished and will be offered as a sweet deal with the grading book.


https://cfashionedu.com/

Phone: 215 884 7065

© Laurel Hoffmann, 2018. 




Thursday, September 6, 2018

76: Sewing Pants


Sew pants in this order:

Check the pant pattern with
a muslin fitting.
Cutting to match produces
high-quality pants, no
matter what fabric is used.

Caution: Before cutting the pants make a muslin to be sure they fit. The muslin can be made from inexpensive fashion fabric. If the muslin's fit is good, the muslin can be worn.


Only an inexpensive sewing machine is needed to make high quality pants, or other high quality garments for that matter. 

Only an inexpensive sewing machine
is needed to make high-quality clothing.
Shown is a 1941
feather-weight sewing machine
1. Set the pockets.

2. Set the zipper. The zipper is set BEFORE the crotch seam is sewn.
When sewing zippers ALWAYS put the fabric that
has more give down to the feed, as shown here. That way
the feed dog will take up the ease, producing a professional finish.
 (The fly facing is stiffened with fusing, 
causing it to be stiffer than the pant front. )

(In the industry one seamstress sets the left side of the zipper, another seamstress sets the other side of the zipper, , the reason there is no stop at the bottom of fly zippers that have been sewn in the industry. After the side and inseams are sewn, the slide is slid up the zipper teeth to close the zipper. Then the crotch seam is sewn. In the home this is not usually practical.) 

3.Sew the crotch seam from the bottom of the zipper's stop to 1 1/2 inch from the front seam/inseam intersection.

4. Sew the side seams.

5. Sew the inseams. 

 Note: If the pants are encased with lining, there is no need to finish the seams, as encasing with lining IS a seam finish. 

6. Sew the crotch seam from 1 1/2 inch from the front seam/inseam to the back waist.

7.  Hem the pants.

8. Sew the waistband.

 The Basics for Sewing Pants and Skirts
contains the information needed to cut and sew
professional pants and skirts.





For complete classroom tested pant sewing information, consider The Basics for Sewing Pants and SkirtsIt contains 470 pages of professional, step-by-step sewing instructions that include inset back and front pockets, zipper sets, lining, hemming and other procedures and tips too numerous to mention.








Making a sample book of the
procedures included in 
The Basics for Sewing Pants and Skirts
helps to develop professional sewing and
tailoring skills. All of these
procedures can be done at home
with minimal equipment.


Many of the procedures in the book are complicated. Making a mock up of some of these procedures is a good idea before attempting to make them in a garment. That is why purchase of the book includes a file of the sample book one can make as one works through the book. Two other files are also included with the purchase: a file of all the mock up patterns that can be printed, and a printout of all of the sample book pages that includes all of the information on the author's master sample book.


If interested in reading more posts about fashion technology, please consider adding your name to this blog's circles. Please consider following me on Facebook where I post links to fashion feeds and other fashion related topics.

Look for the article about seam allowance modification that I wrote for Threads Magazine. It is in their 199 issue that is now in libraries and on the newsstands. 


https://cfashionedu.com/

Phone: 215 884 7065

© Laurel Hoffmann, 2018. 


Sunday, August 26, 2018

75: Preparing to Sew Pants

a: Test the pattern in muslin
to make sure the pattern
fits well. 

Here are the steps involved in preparing to sew pants


1. If you are using a new pattern for the first time, even before you buy the fabric, test the pattern in muslin. Then either look in a three-way mirror to see the fit in the back of the pants, or as a trusted friend to tell you have they look. You can also have your friend take a picture of the back of the pants to make sure they fit well (diagram a).

b: Lay the pants out on the cutting table to determine how much
fabric will be needed. 

2. Determine how much fabric you will need to cut the pants. Lay all of the patterns the same direction. This presents the possibility of shading in the finished garment. Sketch the layout on the front pant pattern.


d: Swatch the fabrics in a notebook.
Add the length and width of the
fabric and where it is stored.


c: Keeping swatches in a swatch book makes
it easy to prevent buying fabrics
you already have while in a fabric store .
3. Before buying the fabric, check fabrics that you already have. A good idea is to have your fabrics inventoried so you can quickly check without going through your stored fabrics.

Keeping swatches in a swatch book with the fabric's width and length makes it easy to check the fabrics you already have (photo d).

Write the yardages on the front, needed to cut favorite patterns. Add your contact information so if lost the booklet can be easily returned (photo c).

4. Consider buying enough fabric (10 yards is a good length) to make not only the pants, but also a top such as a jacket or blouse depending on the fabric's weight, and a skirt. This will provide an ensemble that matches, making it easy to put together a complete outfit whenever needed, for whatever occasion. Buy a color that matches your color palette. Ask other shoppers in the store if the fabric's color is good for you. 

 
e: Check with an L-square to make
sure the fabric is on grain.
f. If the fabric is badly off grain, pin as shown and steam
toward the fold. Stop just before the fold so as not
to press a fold into the fabric.

g. Cut from right-to-left if right handed,
left-to-right if left handed.

5. Prepare the fabric. Check with an L-square that the fabric is on grain (diagram e).

6. If the fabric is badly off grain pin then press as shown in diagram f.

8. Lay the fabric as determined by the previous layout. Refer to the sketch on the front pant pattern (diagram b).





9.  Cut the pants. Cut from right-to-left if right handed, left-to-right if left handed. This way the eyes are always the same distance from the shears. Slide the shears on the table as you cut (diagram g).


More about sewing pants next week.

Diagrams for this post are from
The Basics for Sewing Pants and Skirts.


Your comments are most welcome - Laurel

If interested in reading more posts about fashion technology, please consider adding your name to this blog's circles. Please consider following me on Facebook where I post links to fashion feeds and other fashion related topics.

Look for the article about seam allowance modification that I wrote for Threads Magazine. It will be in their 199 issue that will be on the newsstands in late August (2018). 


https://cfashionedu.com/

Phone: 215 884 7065

© Laurel Hoffmann, 2018. 




Sunday, August 19, 2018

74: How to Measure Crotch Depth


The information in this post is from The Basics for Drafting & Fitting Pants and Skirts. Written by an industrial production pattern maker, tested in the college classroom with Continuing Professional Education Students, the book addresses all custom fit issues, including asymmetrical fit. Drafting instructions are included for inserted back pockets, inserted front pockets and front diagonal pockets with pocket stays, lining, and much more.

Combined with its companion book, The Basics for Sewing Pants and Skirts, the two books present the step-by-step, classroom-tested information you need to produce professional, beautifully fitted skirts and pants.

Below is an overview from The Basics for Drafting & Fitting Pants and Skirts. of how to measure, draft, and fit crotch depth:


Measuring the crotch depth


2-16: Measure the crotch depth by
having the person being fitted sit on a chair.
Write the measurement in
cell 18.

Complete the chart to determine how much depth
should be drafted into the pant pattern.




  1. Have the person being fitted sit on a chair that has no arms. Measure the crotch depth. 
  2. Write the measurement in cell 19 in Chart 2-17, Crotch Measurements.
  3. Add the desired amount of ease in cell 20, usually one inch.
  4. Complete Chart 2-17.









2-15: The crotch length 
starts at the body's
center front at the waist,
continues down the
center front, around
the crotch, and up
the center back
to the center back
at the waist.

About crotch length


The pattern’s crotch length is the seam that runs down the center front from the waist, under the crotch, and up the center back to the waist. It combines vertical and horizontal lines. The desired crotch length is written in cell 18, in Chart 2-17, for future reference.

The pattern’s crotch length is longer than the body’s crotch length because the pattern’s crotch length includes ease.

Even if the crotch length is correct, the pants may not fit correctly through the crotch. That is because the crotch length is comprised of both vertical and horizontal measurements.
If the front and back vertical measurements are too long, the front and back horizontal measurements will be too short causing the crotch’s curves to pull in under the crotch.
If the front and back vertical measurements are too short, the crotch’s curves will be too high and may cause blousing above the hip line.

This diagram from The Basics for Drafting & Fitting Pants and Skirts
shows the pant patterns' crotch length drafted over a skirt sloper
that was previously fitted on the model. 

Drafting pants to fit involves three separate fitting areas

Women have very different fit issues. Fitting pants can be a challenge. Drafting and fitting pants in the classroom with adult women has proven that fitting pants involves three separate fitting areas which are:
  1. The waist to hip area. Draft and correct this area to fit by drafting a skirt sloper (a basic pattern used in the industry to draft patterns for garment styles) to measurements, then cutting and fitting the skirt sloper in muslin.
  2. The crotch area. Draft this area from measurements over the skirt sloper, as shown in the diagram above, so as to incorporate the skirt muslin's fit corrections into the pant pattern.
  3. The legs. Draft from measurements, then muslin fit the crotch and legs. The crotch area is affected by the fit through the legs. If the inseam at the knee is too tight, it will create pulls at the base of the back crotch area, a common problem seen in mass-produced pants. 
  

Effective drafting, fitting, and sewing pants involves:

  1.  Careful measuring - charts are needed to record and determine measurements
  2.  Skillful fitting - transparent clothing in The Basics for Drafting & Fitting Pants and Skirtshows how the fabric lies over the body.
  3.  Precise sewing - step-by-step instructions in The Basics for Sewing Pants and Skirts show how top seamstresses in the industry's designing departments produce high-end pants.


Your comments are most welcome - Laurel

If interested in reading more posts about fashion technology, please consider adding your name to this blog's circles.
Please consider following me on Facebook where I post links to fashion feeds and other fashion related topics.

Look for the article about seam allowance modification that I wrote for Threads Magazine. It will be in their 199 issue that will be on the newsstands in late August (2018). 


https://cfashionedu.com/

Phone: 215 884 7065

© Laurel Hoffmann, 2018. 

Sunday, August 12, 2018

73: Efficient Feed Dog Usage

The presser foot and feed dog work together to
feed the fabric through the machine
 as the seams are sewn.

Effective understanding and use of feed dog speeds the sewing and enables professional results. 

The presser foot and feed dog work together to feed fabric through the machine as the seams are sewn. 

However, the two work differently making several procedures, such as sewing to match and easing in fullness 
easier to do.

The feed dog moves up, then back as it
pulls the fabric through the machine.




The feed dog moves up, then back as it pulls the fabric through the machine.

The presser foot lifts slightly, then lowers, allowing the feed dog to pull the fabric back as the fabric is sewn together.
The presser foot lifts slightly up, then down as the
feed dog moves the fabric back through the machine. 


Because the presser foot does NOT move back, if one does not have full control of the sewing the top ply of fabric will move slower through the machine than the bottom ply of fabric. 


Sewing notch-to-notch solves this problem.



Snip the center of notches
printed on home sewing patterns
so as to be able to align the
two  plies of a seam as the plies
are sewn together.



To prevent the lower ply being sewn faster than the top ply, snip the center of notches that are printed on home sewing patterns. This makes it easier to align the two plies of a seam as it is sewn. 


There are times when allowing the bottom ply to sew faster than the top ply speeds sewing.


Allow the feed dog to ease in the sleeve cap's fullness
as the sleeve cap is sewn into the armhole.






Easing Fullness 

Allowing the feed dog to ease in a sleeve cap's fullness speeds sewing. Pin the notches, then pin in the ease. Sew the cap into the armhole before the side seams are sewn. Then sew the side seams. Finally sew the armhole closed where it is still open at the underarm. 


In this diagram
the bottom ply is
shown slightly extended
to the right to
illustrate how the
bottom ply is laid
slightly behind the top
ply before the
seam is sewn.



Sewing to Match


Holding the bottom ply slightly behind the top ply, enables perfect matching.  

In the diagram on the left the bottom ply is shown slightly extended to the right to illustrate how the bottom ply is laid slightly behind the top ply before the seam is sewn.When sewing to match lay the plies edge-to-edge with the bottom ply laid slightly behind the top ply.

Used in the industry, first test with sample fabric, just how much to hold the bottom ply as the fabric moves through the machine.

Three important considerations:

1. The garment must be cut to match.
2. The two plies of fabric must be cut on the same angle to the grain line.
3. The fabric cannot be basted or pinned.

The amount of the bottom ply that is held back varies with different fabrics, but is usually no more than 1/16 of an inch, making the fabric look as if it is about to be miss-matched as it approaches the needle.

As the fabric moves under the needle, the feed dog will pull the bottom ply in, causing the fabric to match perfectly. 



Your comments are most welcome - Laurel


Look for the article about seam allowance modification that I wrote for Threads Magazine. It will be in their 199 issue that will be on the newsstands in late August (2018). 


Pattern making books, sewing books and sewing classes:
https://cfashionedu.com/


Phone: 215 884 7065
© Laurel Hoffmann, 2018.  

Sunday, August 5, 2018

72: Sustainability


The fashion/ textile industry is second largest industrial polluter on the planet 

Only to the oil industry pollutes the planet more  


This is a huge concern for the fashion industry and was a major topic at the Texworld USA and Apparel Sourcing USA trade show at NYC Javit's Center, last week (July 23-25, 2018)
Americans discard 40 pounds of
clothing a year. Buying better, using
longer is one solution to this problem.
Learning to sew quality clothing
 is another. Quality, custom sewn clothing
made using high-end industrial
procedures, is comfortable,
a delight to wear,
and will still look new
30 years later. 




Some of the reasons for this problem:
  1. Insecticides used in growing cotton result in Texas cotton farmers experiencing a high rate of cancer.
  2. Many chemicals used to produce synthetic fabrics are toxic
  3. Polyester fibers are made from oil - clothing made from these fibers stain easily, causing the clothing to be quickly discarded
  4. Many chemicals used in the finishing of fabrics are toxic. One can smell these chemicals when one enters a clothing or fabric store
  5. After 50 washings to remove the chemicals, some may still remain
  6. Dyes can be toxic
  7. Consumers buy cheap clothing, which has a short life
    Color analysis enables better selection of wardrobe
    items, and the ability to create a wardrobe
     that requires fewer pieces.
    More information
    span
  8. Not all manufactured clothing is purchased, creating waste
  9. Global transportation of fabrics and manufactured clothing requires considerable energy, adding to the pollution
  10. The average American discards 40 pounds of clothing a year.
  11. Land fills are filling up with discarded clothing
  12. An excessive time frame is needed for discarded synthetic fabrics to decompose
Sustainability comes up over and over again in the fashion feeds. Here is one I received recently:

Prada will host a conference on sustainability titled “Shaping a Sustainable Digital Future”,in partnership with the Yale School of Management and the Polytechnic University of Milan’s School of Management. Set to take place on November 20 at the Prada Foundation in Milan, this is the second event in Prada’s “Shaping a Future” series of cultural conversations. Launched last year, the initiative aims to bring academics and businesses together to discuss how to build a sustainable future.

  • “‘Shaping a Sustainable Digital Future” will explore the large impact and implications of digitalization on business and societal sustainability”, said Prada in a statement. Representatives from several businesses and institutions will take part in the discussions, which will be attended by the business students from both partner universities.
Fit is one of the main
reasons so much clothing
is either not purchased
or is discarded.
Far too many manufactured
 pants pull in the crotch.
A custom fitted pants pattern solves that problem.
Drafting & Fitting Pants and Skirts

shows how to draft to
prevent pulls under the crotch.
  • But you don’t have to study at Yale or the Polytechnic University of Milan to watch the conference, as it will also be live-streamed on Prada’s website. More information about the live-streaming, as well as the event's program and speakers, is to published on Prada's website soon. ##
At the trade show's seminar, Consumer Engagement and Shifting Consumer Preferences, Bruce Thomson, Co-founder and CEO of Bright Label, discussed how he is working to bring transparency to manufacturers' clothing labels. 

As stated in his seminar's description he said: Increasingly, brands are investing in sustainable sourcing, certified materials, and transparency; meanwhile, consumers, especially millennials, are demonstrating a greater desire to know more about how their clothes were made before they buy.  Texworld USA Summer 2018 - Seminar Series Schedule.



Your comments are most welcome - Laurel


Look for the article about seam allowance modification that I wrote for Threads Magazine. It will be in their 199 issue that will be on the newsstands in late August (2018). 


Books: https://cfashionedu.com/

Phone: 215 884 7065
© Laurel Hoffmann, 2018.